columns

Hate Speech Phenomena on the Rise; Its Impact on The Democratic Transformation

Al-Sammani Awadallah

The freedom of expression resulted from Juba Peace Agreement has led to the escalation of hate speech to the extent that it represented a great threat to social security and peace.

This escalation overwhelmed all the official and popular institutions besides the civil society organizations a matter that made the citizens feel unsafe.

Within the endeavors to contribute to eliminating this ugly phenomenon, the High Academy of Strategic and Security Studies hosted a workshop under the title (Towards National Vision to Fight and Confront the Hate Speech).

The workshop is organized in collaboration with the UNDP and the EU and was honored by the presence of the Minister of Religious Affairs and Endowments on behalf of the Prime Minister, Ministers of Defence and Foreign Affairs along with the Director of the General Intelligence Service.

The workshop comes to support the transitional government in confronting terrorism and hate speech to reduce the cycle of violence.

The workshop, which found the welcoming from the UNDP and the EU, will lead to achieving great goals to coincide with the UN goals.

Observers consider hate speech as a threat to social values. It is a developed speech and can expand, so it is crucial to curb it to support the democratic transformation opportunities.

The participation of the Ministry of Religious Affairs and endowments in such workshops has its significance considering the great role of the worship houses in awareness through direct messages and recalling the noble value of the holy books which promote the peaceful coexistence among the people.

Curbing hate speech is an essential issue to create a real democratic community in which all people enjoy their rights equally.

Hate speech is a menace to democratic values, social stability, and peace. As a matter of principle, hate speech must be confronted at every turn and be tackled to prevent armed conflict, atrocity crimes, and terrorism, end violence against women and other serious violations of human rights, and promote peaceful, inclusive, and just societies.

The uncontrolled political address has become a phenomenon even after December glorious Revolution by some of the forces and components of the transitional period despite the noble slogans of the revolution that promote freedom, peace, and justice besides the values of tolerance and accepting “the other” towards establishing a national state the tops the national interests.

The national and international laws indeed incriminate the hate speech and the uncontrolled political address, but those laws require political will to be applicable on the ground.

Hate speech is deep-rooted in the Sudanese culture resulted from ethnic and religious arrogance a matter that represents a real threat to national unity, cohesion, and social peace.

The ousted regime contributed to devoting the tyranny through its uncontrolled political address a matter that requires appropriate dealing with the phenomenon at all levels.

Many inter-communal clashes start as individual disputes. Civil society groups consistently identify the need for the government to take responsibility for de-escalating attacks, protecting citizens, and holding those responsible to account. Silence and lack of intervention have resulted in chronic insecurity and escalating violence.

Local groups repeatedly point to Sudan’s weak and discriminatory justice system. The perceived lack of official uptake in resolving cases drives people to take matters into their own hands, often escalating tensions and leading to cyclical patterns of violence.

The Sudanese government must take account of the whole picture, addressing legal, structural, and social change. There is a need to break down center-periphery discrimination by embracing inclusive processes that provide genuine dialogue and decision-making powers to affected groups. Critically, the government must address its weak justice system, as well as the backlog of discriminatory laws that need reforming and new laws that are necessary to give effect to international standards to promote equality and counter hate speech.

It is high time for the transitional government to formulate a national strategy to combat hate speech through reconciliation amid the political forces in coordination with public corporations and civil society organizations.

The dialogue and establishing a consensus national project will have a considerable contribution in eliminating hate speech.

The Sudanese government must take account of the whole picture, addressing legal, structural, and social change. There is a need to break down center-periphery discrimination by embracing inclusive processes that provide genuine dialogue and decision-making powers to affected groups. Critically, the government must address its weak justice system, as well as the backlog of discriminatory laws that need reforming and new laws that are necessary to give effect to international standards to promote equality and counter hate speech.

Transitional justice, if applied, could also contribute to the elimination of hate speech.

Media, educational institutions, Sofi sects, local administration leaders, dignitaries, and civil society organizations have its leading role in reducing hate speech through launching a campaign under the slogan (Together against Hate Speech) to be participated by educational institutions and media outlets to raise the awareness amid all components of the society.

Back to top button