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WFP and Khalsa Aid International Strike Partnership to Support Most Vulnerable in Two Critical Food Crises

Rome/London/Khartoum – The World Food Programme (WFP) welcomes a contribution of US$ 2.75 million from Khalsa Aid International as part of a three-year program to support school children in Yemen and refugees from the Tigray Crisis.

A partnership between WFP and Khalsa Aid International will deliver vitally needed support to Yemen and to refugees who have fled from Ethiopia’s Tigray region to Sudan. This collaboration will help WFP to maintain programs that provide vulnerable children and women with the nutrition they need to survive and thrive.

In Yemen, Khalsa Aid International’s contribution will go towards WFP’s Healthy Kitchens program, supporting collective kitchens that employ vulnerable members of the community – 80 percent of whom are women – to prepare fresh, healthy meals for almost 10,000 school children. The meals are made with locally sourced ingredients and respect domestic food culture, while also providing local producers with regular business.

In Sudan, the partnership will facilitate essential nutrition assistance to refugees who have fled the Tigray crisis in neighboring Ethiopia. This assistance will help protect and support tens of thousands of individuals, particularly children under five and pregnant and breastfeeding women who are at risk of suffering from malnutrition.

“Through this partnership, we will reach more communities with more of what they need most: food, help, and hope. We thank Khalsa Aid International for its shared commitment to building a world without hunger and for its trust in WFP’s ability to deliver for the people we serve,” says Tim Hunter, Director of Private Sector Partnerships and Fundraising at WFP.

Ravi Singh, Founder, and CEO of Khalsa Aid International say: “Khalsa Aid International is proud to do what we can to provide vitally needed support to the most vulnerable in two critical food crises in Yemen and Sudan. We are delighted with the partnership we have formed with WFP, which builds on our previous humanitarian initiatives, and have selected programs that provide vulnerable children and women with the nutrition they need to survive. Feeding people, nutritious food is at the core of Khalsa.

Aid’s work, in line with the Sikh philosophy of langar (free community kitchen) and Seva (meaning selfless service to humanity), which is at the core of all our current global programs. Through this partnership, Khalsa Aid has further extended its reach in feeding the hungry globally. I envisage this is just the start of a long partnership to help feed the world’s hungry.”

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